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Vale Rod May

One of Australia’s ecological farming pioneers, and a close friend, passed away today. Rod May aged 63 died in intensive care after a road accident between Ballarat and his family farm at Blampied 5 days previously. Rod was a 4th generation farmer on 200 acres at the foot of Kangaroo Hills in the prime red cropping country of central Victoria. In the late 1970’s Rod returned to the farm motivated by interest in self reliance, organics and tree crops and “fell back into farming” as something to do in between starting the Central Victorian Tree Planting Co-op and getting elected to the very conservative Creswick Council.

Photo: Josie Alexandra

The Landcare movement emerged simultaneously in several regions across Australia in the late 70’s and early 80’s. One of those places was central Victoria and Rod May played a leading roll in it. In 1983 when Project Branchout received federal funding to employ people to plant trees on demonstration sites right across the Campaspe, Loddon and Avoca catchments in response to the threat of salinity, the committee fell on their feet in employing Rod and his crew from the CVTPC to manage the huge program. Rod had the same holistic vision of the committee, the ability to take risks, roll with the punches and engage with conservative farmers, and with some of the unemployed workers putting the trees in the ground. Most importantly he had dirt under his nails as both a farmer and tree planter.

Rod May, 1992. Photo: David Holmgren

Rod was not part of the first generation of organic farmers but he was one of the generation that integrated the new ecological thinking of the 1970’s including permaculture, and connected it to the emerging markets for organic produce that lead to organic certification in the late 80’s. As founding president of the National Association for Sustainable Agriculture Australia (in 1986) Rod May was at the forefront of driving the importance of links between ecological science, organics and the emerging sustainable development concept. At the same time he was converting his part of the family farm to organics, implementing large-scale plantings of shelter, fodder, timber, fruit and nut , still working for Project Branchout in their Bicentennial revegetation of the Captains Creek Catchment that included the family farm. As plantation designer I worked closely with Rod at that time and remember when he and I headed up the steep slopes of Kangaroo Hills overlooking the May family farm to get some of the shelterbelts in the ground. I had my two-year-old son Oliver to help us and that began a thirty-year bond between Oliver and Rod.

As organics grew in the 1990’s, Rod spent an increasing amount of time in meetings around the country and the world making the global linkages through the International Federation of Organic Farming Movements and doing some of the first organic certifications for farmers ranging from cranky older generation organic pioneers to coffee growers in East Timor and lake bed croppers in the semi arid zone. His keen observation skills, memory for facts, figures and protocols, his slow talking easy going manner and his enjoying a beer or, in the right circles, a joint allowed him to tackle novel situations and always learn something new.

Rod at home on the family farm, Blampied. Photo: David Holmgren

I remember when the diverse and disparate organic and biodynamic groups where having to work together with the Australian government to establish protocols for organic export trade. Alex Podolinsky, head of Demeter Biodynamics would not speak to any of the NASAA people except Rod “because he was the only real farmer”. I arrived early one day at the farm to have Rod introduce me to Alex Podolinsky, who immediately launched into an explanation of what was wrong with permaculture. After Alex left I asked what the visit was about. Rod said he thought it was an “informal biodynamic inspection.”

This understated diplomacy allowed Rod to work with the idealists and the pragmatists of the organic movement, even if his sometimes slap dash approach to getting things done in drafting a document or consigning pallets of veggies left his partners frustrated and sometimes having to pick up the pieces. Life at home with Viv and their daughters Stephanie and Carla, as well as his brothers Greg, Doug and their families on the family farm was not always smooth but as an outside observer, one of the ways in which Rod contributed to harmony was a tolerance of whatever others dished up for him. He and Viv lived fairly independent lives but their wide social circle and love of a party kept them going between their respective passions for organic farming and teaching.

I can remember Su phoning Rod’s father Maurice to find out where Rod was and the exasperated answer; somewhere in America and I don’t know when he’s back. But I also remember marvelling at Rod getting back from an trans pacific flight then the same afternoon jumping on the tractor to plough up the new veggie cropping paddock before the rains came. During those years of globe trotting Maurice provided a back stop for Rod and supported the organic methods which were adopted by brothers Greg and Doug. Like his father, Rod was a big bloke and worked like few of the baby boom generation could. Within the organic/green movement intellectuals he was as sharp as the best of us but in the spud paddock, no one I know could work day in day out like Rod. I remember when I had a chronicly bad back he told me in all seriousness that picking spuds was great for fixing a bad back. In his later years his knees began to give him trouble after all those years working across the furrows and mounds of several acres of irrigated vegetable he cranked out year after year.

Rod with PDC students. Photo: Ian Lillington

In the early 1990s we began taking our residential Permaculture Design Course participants to his farm to get a taste, literally, of a real organic farm that best illustrated permaculture principles supplying local and central markets with basic food. Rod’s seamless grasp of everything from soil ecology, tree crop potentials, organic marketing and mechanics and gadgets involved in farming, was immense. We would go out and harvest the veg that didn’t meet commercial standards and take it back to the farmhouse where Su would organise the roast lunch with Maurice helping cook the farm killed mutton.

While we promoted Captains Creek as a good example of permaculture, Rod never did. In a piece I wrote in the early 1990’s I said many ecological pioneers who chose not to describe their work as permaculture did so for one of three reasons; because of the bad examples they had seen called permaculture, because they didn’t want to alienate more conservative audiences or because they didn’t think what they were doing met the high ecological standards they associated with the permaculture concept. In Rod’s case I believe it was a mix of the three with the last being the most important.

Food Relocalisation in action. Rod delivering CSA veggie boxes to Su at the Hepburn Relocalisation Network food co-op. Photo: David Holmgren

During the 1990’s I watched the rewards and strictures of supplying central markets pushing Rod towards being a specialist broccoli producer supplying Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and even Brisbane markets in mid to late summer when it was difficult for producers in warmer districts to do so. Rod was surprised at his own success. He thought that once the market for organics became established, the big specialist vegetable growers would take over and that he would head the other way diversifying to supply local markets using methods he had seen working in Europe, Japan and the US including farmer’s markets and community supported agriculture.

Rod’s involvement in the international organic scene continued with his membership of the scientific advisory board, IFOAM and in 2005 in bringing the IFOAM international conference to Adelaide. But over time he started to organise his exit from organics politics and to encourage the next generation onto the board of NASAA including our son Oliver. Rod’s political focus shifted back to local government and in 2006 he was elected to the Hepburn Shire. Su recalls that Rod was rather slack about campaigning, but his charm, laid back style and ability to connect to the average person got him over the line.

Around the same time after some pestering by Su to produce boxes for local customers instead of all being shipped off to central markets, Rod asked her when she wanted to start. The next week Rod delivered 6 cardboard boxes full of mixed unwashed veggies to our place for pick up by the customers that Su had organised.

Over the following couple of seasons Rod turned his whole farming operation around to focus on boxes delivered to Hepburn, Castlemaine, Ballarat and Melbourne. In the same way that centralised markets reward monocultural specialisation, box schemes demand diversity from the farmer. The fact that Rod turned his relatively large production scale around to supply that diversity was testament to his skills as a farmer. Rod’s fields were rough and ready even by organic standards, full of weeds and some produce not making the grade but the productivity from limited and often erratic input of skilled labour was truly amazing.

Rod in 2005 at the IFOAM conference doing an Aussie farmer skit. Photo: David Holmgren

Apart from extra needs for catering for events and courses, we have always grown our own produce without the fuel and gadgets (Rod’s term for farm equipment) that sustained Rod’s farming operation but there were years where in disgust I thought I should give up and just buy from Rod. Whatever the season and the weather Rod just kept on delivering and at the end of the season the weedy fields full of left over veg was good to fatten the sheep after the gleaners had their share. My personal comparison with Rod led me to assert that I am probably a better ecological builder than ecological farmer but I know what the world needs more. We have enough buildings already but we need to eat each day.

On council Rod was a mover and a shaker, using his deep experience with negotiation and decision making, process and protocol to good effect but in a context very different from the parochial years on Creswick council in his youth. He championed a Climate Change and Peak Oil policy for Hepburn Shire, the second in the state and a number of other pioneering initiatives at a time when Hepburn was becoming famous for the first community owned wind farm in Australia.

After Viv died tragically in the Samoan tsunami in 2009 Rod poured himself into local council, and as mayor contributed to the growth of the local food culture as central to the tourist economy of the region. In 2011 he managed to get funding for an Energy Descent Action Plan for Hepburn shire but Rod’s vision and the consultancy that I delivered in response were too radical even for our progressive environmentally aware community.

On the home front Rod began to focus on the future with development of Viv’s Lang Road property and a vision for the farm into the future. After leaving council Rod threw himself into a farm redevelopment plan at the same time as he was active in the Greens, supporting his daughter Steph’s candidacy, and even stood for the Greens in the seat of Ripon.

He did try to engage me in a farm planning process but with my focus on teaching and writing, Rod couldn’t wait and in typical style he whipped up cabins, an autonomous power system, new fencing, a farm processing shed and other infrastructure necessary following the formal division of the farm between the three brothers following Maurice’s death. It was only around this time that I discovered my good mate had originally trained as a diesel mechanic and that his ability with machines was more than rudimentary but like everything else if a vehicle or machine was working, Rod’s energy was focused elsewhere. If machinery failed, like sheep getting into the crops, Rod could just cut his loses and move on.

Rod was also a motorbike rider, what a friend and local doctor called “a temporary citizen”. Just another one of the risks he took along with the weather, the crops, the politics and at times the law. But I know that while Rod had incredible energy he was not manic and not ever what I would call reckless.

When his luck ran out on the way home from Ballarat after getting a tool for current building projects, the wonders of modern intensive care gave the hope of a rebuild and another chance for my old mate Rod to at least pass on his incredible knowledge of the farm and life to the next generation. But that process was already well underway. After decades of working with and teaching volunteers, interns and community members the in and outs of farming, Rod had been working with his daughters on the farm future. Stephanie and her partner Oggy along with his bother Serge have been working to keep Captains Creek organics humming.

Hopefully the farm customers and especially all of us who knew Rod can support the May family to build on the vision and the legacy after the great man had to cut his loses and move on

To Rod’s family, daughters, Steph + Carla, and his brothers, Greg and Doug, we send our love and deepest condolence.

– David Holmgren, Hepburn, 30 May 2017

You can read the obituary Jason Alexandra and I wrote for Rod in The Age here.

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Permaculture Design Course @ Rocklyn Ashram

Permaculture Design Course

Friday 10 – Saturday 25 Feb 2017

Rocklyn Ashram

Are you looking to:

  • create a more sustainable lifestyle?
  • meet like-minded people?
  • retrofit your house, your community and your life?
  • become less dependent on big business and supermarkets?
  • design a resilient system in the face of growing uncertainties?


The course

A PDC can be a life changing experience. Join us in the unique environment of the Rocklyn Ashram and be taught by a mix of experienced and enthusiastic permaculture tutors including David Holmgren.

This is a fully residential, fully catered course running over 14 days with a short break in the middle. This is a completely immersive experience.

The course will be structured around Holmgren’s 12 permaculture principles (detailed in Permaculture: principles and pathways beyond sustainability) and goes beyond land-based design, bringing permaculture to all aspects of human living.

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The venue

The course will take place at the Rocklyn Ashram, nestled in the Wombat Forest near Daylesford in Central Victoria. Only a two-hour drive from Melbourne, you will feel like you are in another world. Beautiful and quiet, this special space creates an ideal learning environment.

Taking part in the ashram’s daily yoga program can further enhance your learning and enrich your experience. The ashram environment exemplifies and provides an experience of living by permaculture ethics. The serene and spiritual focus of the ashram complements the mindfulness of permaculture practice and reminds us to balance our activity and think with reflection.

Accommodation is gender segregated triple share, or BYO camping equipment.

At times the ashram program and the intensity of the course can seem challenging, however almost all of the participants comment that the benefits continue long after the course ends.

 

The food

Delicious, wholesome and ethical meals will be prepared by Su Dennett and the ashram’s kitchen volunteers. She will make sure that what you eat meets permaculture standards. Items will be sourced from local organic and bio-dynamic growers in a living example of using and maintaining sustainable food supply networks. You will be served vegetarian meals together with the ashram residents.

 

Tutors

You will learn from the co-founder of permaculture, David Holmgren, and a team of excellent permaculture practitioners and educators. Their depth of practical and theoretical knowledge will make this a very special PDC. There will be also be opportunities to socialise with the presenters outside of session times.

 

Prerequisites?

There are no prerequisites for this course, but it is recommended you read the Essence of Permaculture if you have not yet done so. All other titles by David Holmgren are highly recommended for those who have read Essence already. Please have a look through our online store or visit your local library.

 

Course content

This course will equip you with the foundations of permaculture. You will learn permaculture ethics, principles and design, and their application across the domains, so that you can integrate them into all aspects of your life.

Topics include: permaculture ethics and principles; ecology and natural cycles; weather and climates; soils; permaculture food growing; energy literacy; reading the landscape; appropriate technology; built environment; design processes and practices; animals in permaculture; health and spiritual wellbeing; urban retrofitting; finance and economics; and community strategies.

The classroom experience will be complemented by field trips to working permaculture systems including one of the best documented demonstration sites, Melliodora.

You will work on a design project of part of the ashram during the course. You will be guided by experienced tutors and learn the fundamentals of permaculture to design the world you want.

 

How to enrol

The course size is limited to 26 students so you will need to book early. Cost including full board is $2400, but all you need is the $500 deposit to secure your place now.

If you choose the camping option you will receive $150 cash back upon arrival at the Ashram.

Please note: We do not take deposits from outside Australia. If you are applying from outside Australia, we only accept the full amount via direct bank transfer.

Please read the Ashram Lifestyle Information page before enrolling. Choose your payment below and complete the enrolment form.

 

Payment and extra charges

Please see the How Do I Pay? page for more details.

 

Item Fee (AUD$) Due
Non-refundable deposit – Australian participant $500 Upon enrolment
Remaining course fee – Australian participant – earlybird $1700 Friday 2nd December 2016
Remaining course fee – Australian participant – full fee $1900
Course fee – Australian / Overseas participant – earlybird $2200 Upon enrolment, before Friday 2nd December 2016
Course fee – Australian / Overseas participant – full fee $2400 Upon enrolment
Overseas payment / Payment via paypal – bank charge $35 With payment – per transaction
Private accommodation at the Ashram Variable With payment – prior booking is essential

 

Is there concession price?

Yes, we do offer a concession rate on a needs basis via an application process. Please fill in this form before Friday November 18 to be eligible.

*  *  *

Still have questions? Please read through our FAQ page.

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Pascoe & Holmgren: Land & Culture

Well, what a night! Thank you to everyone who came along to Land Cultures to hear Bruce and David tell stories and share knowledges and experiences. The Daylesford Town Hall was packed with keen punters of all ages. If you weren’t able to make it, we’ll share the podcast and video as soon as they’re available. For now, here are a few photos that capture the wonderful spirit of the night. Thank you Oliver Holmgren for the pics and thank you to the Hepburn Relocalisation Network for organising the event with the support of the Hepburn Shire Council.

Dark Emu-1_blog

A traditional smoking ceremony

 

Graham Atkinson says Womin-dji-ka (welcome) to Dja Dja Wurrung country

 

Packed to the rafters.

Patrick Jones MCs the proceedings.

 

Pete O’Mara addresses the crowd

 

Bruce and David with their partners Lyn and Su.

 

David responds to Bruce

 

A full house

Thank you to Mike Brown, Cameron Saunders and Anthony Petrucci for recording the talks and Q&A session afterwards. Here is the podcast for those who couldn’t make it on the night, or for those who’d like to relive it:

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/258551095″ params=”auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&visual=true” width=”70%” height=”450″ iframe=”true” /]

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Land Cultures: shared knowledges

Bruce Pascoe and David Holmgren to meet and share knowledges

Award-winning Australian writer, editor and anthologist Bruce Pascoe is leading a movement of researchers that is rewriting Aboriginal history in Australia.

On Thursday April 7 2016 Pascoe will visit Daylesford for a series of free events including Land Cultures: Aboriginal economies and permaculture futures at the Daylesford Town Hall at 7.30pm – Bruce Pascoe in conversation with David Holmgren.

LandCultures_jpeg_lThe evening event will commence with a Dja Dja Wurrung smoking ceremony and Welcome to Country. A Hepburn Shire Council representative will present a progress report on the Shire’s recognition and reconciliation projects. Pascoe’s keynote address will be followed by a response from David Holmgren, before opening the discussion to the floor. Supper will be provided by Hepburn Relocalisation Network (for a gold coin donation).

Come and join the discussion and understand how the foods of Australia pre-1788 may become the foods of a climate-altered 21st century economy that acknowledge and celebrate the past. You can join the Facebook event here.

Other free events on the day include:

2pm tour of Dja Dja Wurrung tools at the Daylesford Museum.
3pm reading by Bruce of his young adult fiction at the Daylesford Library.
4pm planting of murnongs (yam daisies) at the Daylesford Library community garden.

All events are presented by the Hepburn Relocalisation Network with the generous assistance and funding of the Hepburn Shire Council.

* * *

Bruce Pascoe has a Bunurong and Tasmanian heritage. In his latest book, Dark Emu: black seeds, Pascoe shows that the Aboriginal history we were taught in school — that indigenous Australians were chancey hunter-gatherer nomads — is a fiction. Using point of contact journals by European explorers, Pascoe demonstrates the extent of the ecologically sensitive agricultural practices that existed in Australia pre-1788, and shows that Aboriginal Australians were possibly the world’s first bread makers, preceding the Egyptians by at least 18,000 years.

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local happiness, global happiness

An enormous event is coming up next weekend. The Local Lives, Global Matters conference is gearing up to a great conference with the range of local and international speakers.

Over three days, at Castlemaine, the conference examines and discusses the way to get happier.

The solution seems local.  Communities all around the world are already doing it. The conference is planning to builds on what is already happening by fostering thriving, local and regional economies and societies, and accelerating the transition to a world without fossil fuels and growth addictions.

39e4213c-7373-4180-b0fe-93c5e9e651c0It is not your usual ‘conference’ though, the program is full of plenaries, workshops, story-telling, arts and music, as well as site visits showcasing local initiatives. Themes include meaningful livelihoods, reducing scale, reclaiming democracy, local interdependence and the strengthening of spiritual values. Speakers to appear include David Holmgren (one of the keynote speakers at the town hall on the first day), Helena Norberg-Hodge, Manish Jain (India), Camila Moreno (Brazil), Rob Hopkins (UK), Raphael Souchier (France), Samuel Alexander, Susan Murphy, Dave Rastovich and Lauren Hill Australia).
In fact, David will be there over three days.

On Friday David will deliver a keynote speech (3.40pm) at the town hall.

On Sat, he will take part in a panel discussion in Manish Jain’s plenary session on “Social and ecological justice” (10am) along with Camilla Moreno who will then give a session on “Reclaiming democracy”.

Then on Sunday, he will be a part of the panel with Ellen Madigan, Latarnie McDonald, Michelle and Chris McColl, Rob Kirby, and Helena Norberg-Hodge to disucss the problem of the centralised food  supply system.  For his final appearance, on Sunday at the town hall David will  be a part of the closing plenary session with Jacques Boulet and Norberg Hodge to sum up the weekend.

It is a choc a block weekend already, but there is another good one on Saturday afternoon, pop over to the Buckley room at St Mary’s Church at 4.15pm. Su Dennett and Maureen Corbett from Hepburn Relocalisation Network will give a workshop called “Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained” to follow up Urban Food Collective/Kym Blechynden (Feed the Future).

More here.

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“Unlikely rock star of the food scene” to workshop in Daylesford

9288376703_44d5d91f74_cWe have all heard about the value of fermented food. At Melliodora, we are big fans of fermented food, making use of all sorts of fermented stuff every day. Naturally, we make our own yoghurt, kefir and miso and so on. Once you find out how they work, you don’t need to be a biochemist or a rocket scientist to enjoy the art of fermentation. So, you could say we are fairly familiar with the process but when we heard that the fermentation champion author, Sandor Katz is coming to town to do a workshop, we coudn’t help being excited.

Sandor Katz is a fermentation revivalist. His 2003 book Wild Fermentation was a buzz. Through the hundreds of fermentation workshops he has taught across North America and beyond, he has ignited the revival of the fermentation arts throughout the world. A self-taught experimentalist who lives in rural Tennessee, the New York Times calls him “one of the unlikely rock stars of the American food scene”. His latest book, The Art of Fermentation, is indeed the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published.

Learn how simple it is to make your own kimchi, kefir, and other fermented delicacies at his workshop in Daylesford on Feb 27. Learn about the healing qualities and nutritional importance of live-culture ferments, as well as their illustrious history and integral role in human cultural evolution. Empower yourself with simple techniques for fermenting these healthful foods in your home. Be part of the fermentation revival.fart

For more details about the workshop and bookings, please contact Hepburn Relocalisation Network, hrn@internode.on.net .

To mark the Sandor Katz’s visit, Holmgren Design have stocked up on The Art of Fermentation, now available from our on-line shop. Check it out before the workshop, or if you cannot attend, reading this book is the next best thing, we reckon.

See more at Sandor Katz’s wild fermentation website.

 

 

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Blooming at the Floraide

In May David was asked to write a letter of support for Permaculture Canberra. Permaculture Canberra, along with Urban Agriculture Australia, Canberra City Farm, Permablitz ACT, Canberra Organic Growers, South Coast Producers and Soils for LIfe. They were putting proposal to display an urban farming and permaculture display in the centennery ACT Floriade show.

David thought it a good idea.

Over the last ten years the growth in interest in producing food at home for food security, health and pleasure has substantially exceeded previous waves of interest in the late 1970’s and the late 1980s-early 1990’s. It is very clear that gardeners are hungry for information and inspiration for growing food as part of their living environment. The ACT Floriade  provides an opportunity to reach a sector of the Australian gardening public that might not have been exposed to all of the creative opportunities to grow food at home.

The perception that permaculture specifically, and garden farming more generally, are antithetical to gardening for aesthetic pleasure, is a common one. This false impression can be overturned by well presented and integrated examples of food, herb and flower growing that are ecologically sound, productive and aesthetically pleasing. The proposal has the potential to make a contribution in this regard.

I am particularly pleased to support a proposal where so many local and regional groups, some with a history going back decades are partnering to bring the best of organics and permaculture generally to the gardening public.  I think the synergies that will come from this partnership could enable greater appreciation, by the public as well as  policy makers, of productive environmentalism.

For Floriade, I think this proposal is an opportunity to expand the environmental credentials of the event by responding the burgeoning public interest in food growing as a natural and normal part of our living environment.

They got the gig, and judging from their facebook entries, it was a resounding success.

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They received a big pat on the shoulder from the event’s organisers as well.

The display delivered by Urban Agriculture Australia was of a very high standard and all those
involved were extremely professional……..

Urban Agriculture Australia had a
large contingent of volunteers who provided an interactive experience for visitors for the full 30 days of Floriade and 5 nights of NightFest.

The display proved to be extremely popular with visitors, with many of them leaving having indicated that they intended to recreate aspects of the display in their own garden.

On top of the display Urban Agriculture Australia volunteers also delivered two talks each day during the full month of Floriade. These talks were well attended and delivered in a very professional manner.

Well done guys.

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Spring Creek community forest tours

Spring Creek Community Forest is the name we give to an informal project by local residents managing a section of public land (part of the Hepburn Regional Park) along Spring Creek between the Hepburn Mineral Springs Reserve and Breakneck Gorge. For over 25 years we have been active in initiating working bees constructing walking paths, managing naturalised vegetation (so called ‘weeds’), planting trees and building gabions and leaky weirs to slow and manage flood waters along tributary gullies and the main creek. Observation, scientific research and  documenting ecological changes over the last 25 years, particularly in relation to willow ecology makes Spring Creek an important reference site in the debate over management of willows along streams in southern Australia.

A tour down Spring Creek with David Holmgren

A tour down Spring Creek with David Holmgren

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Permaculture: A Rhymer’s Manual – David doesn’t cringe

12 Jacket (3mm Spine) [GDOB-30H3-007}“He gave me the best response ever… He got on the blower and said ‘It’s great. I listened to the whole thing…and I didn’t cringe once.'”
Apparently that is how David Holmgren responded upon listening to the album, inspired by and named after the concept he jointly developed some three decades ago, according to the recent ABC radio piece.
You can sample some of the Charlie Mgee‘s Formidable Vegetable Sounds System’s debut album “Permaculture: a Rhymer’s Manual” played live at the launch in Melbourne in April.
PRMLaunchPosterWEB
David will be there not only to give a test drive to his newly acquired dancing shoes to serious ukelele music, but also  to say a few words about what could well be the first ever permaculture “concept” album.
When: 6pm Saturday April 6.

Where: CERES Environmental Park
Cost: (recommended donation $15) BYO drinks and snacks

The album is now available through the HD shop.

Here’s a footage of Formidable Vegetable Sound System in full flight at the Eclipse 2012 Festival in Cairns.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BDdizZsABQ?rel=0]

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Su Dennett inducted to the Honour Roll

Su receiving her award

Su Dennett, David Holmgren’s partner in permaculture development and the backbone of the HD, was inducted to the Hepburn Shire’s Women’s Honour Roll.

Su was recognised as a role model for women choosing a home and community based lifestyle as an empowering and effective way to contribute to a better world.

You can read her induction speech written and delivered by Dr Anne Gleeson on this year’s International Women’s Day ceremony.

Su Dennett and friends

Onya Su, we are so privilaged to be sharing life with you.

Two women inducted to Hepburn Shire honour roll (the local Advocate newspaper article).

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