Vale Rod May

One of Australia’s ecological farming pioneers, and a close friend, passed away today. Rod May aged 63 died in intensive care after a road accident between Ballarat and his family farm at Blampied 5 days previously. Rod was a 4th generation farmer on 200 acres at the foot of Kangaroo Hills in the prime red cropping country of central Victoria. In the late 1970’s Rod returned to the farm motivated by interest in self reliance, organics and tree crops and “fell back into farming” as something to do in between starting the Central Victorian Tree Planting Co-op and getting elected to the very conservative Creswick Council.

Photo: Josie Alexandra

The Landcare movement emerged simultaneously in several regions across Australia in the late 70’s and early 80’s. One of those places was central Victoria and Rod May played a leading roll in it. In 1983 when Project Branchout received federal funding to employ people to plant trees on demonstration sites right across the Campaspe, Loddon and Avoca catchments in response to the threat of salinity, the committee fell on their feet in employing Rod and his crew from the CVTPC to manage the huge program. Rod had the same holistic vision of the committee, the ability to take risks, roll with the punches and engage with conservative farmers, and with some of the unemployed workers putting the trees in the ground. Most importantly he had dirt under his nails as both a farmer and tree planter.

Rod May, 1992. Photo: David Holmgren

Rod was not part of the first generation of organic farmers but he was one of the generation that integrated the new ecological thinking of the 1970’s including permaculture, and connected it to the emerging markets for organic produce that lead to organic certification in the late 80’s. As founding president of the National Association for Sustainable Agriculture Australia (in 1986) Rod May was at the forefront of driving the importance of links between ecological science, organics and the emerging sustainable development concept. At the same time he was converting his part of the family farm to organics, implementing large-scale plantings of shelter, fodder, timber, fruit and nut , still working for Project Branchout in their Bicentennial revegetation of the Captains Creek Catchment that included the family farm. As plantation designer I worked closely with Rod at that time and remember when he and I headed up the steep slopes of Kangaroo Hills overlooking the May family farm to get some of the shelterbelts in the ground. I had my two-year-old son Oliver to help us and that began a thirty-year bond between Oliver and Rod.

As organics grew in the 1990’s, Rod spent an increasing amount of time in meetings around the country and the world making the global linkages through the International Federation of Organic Farming Movements and doing some of the first organic certifications for farmers ranging from cranky older generation organic pioneers to coffee growers in East Timor and lake bed croppers in the semi arid zone. His keen observation skills, memory for facts, figures and protocols, his slow talking easy going manner and his enjoying a beer or, in the right circles, a joint allowed him to tackle novel situations and always learn something new.

Rod at home on the family farm, Blampied. Photo: David Holmgren

I remember when the diverse and disparate organic and biodynamic groups where having to work together with the Australian government to establish protocols for organic export trade. Alex Podolinsky, head of Demeter Biodynamics would not speak to any of the NASAA people except Rod “because he was the only real farmer”. I arrived early one day at the farm to have Rod introduce me to Alex Podolinsky, who immediately launched into an explanation of what was wrong with permaculture. After Alex left I asked what the visit was about. Rod said he thought it was an “informal biodynamic inspection.”

This understated diplomacy allowed Rod to work with the idealists and the pragmatists of the organic movement, even if his sometimes slap dash approach to getting things done in drafting a document or consigning pallets of veggies left his partners frustrated and sometimes having to pick up the pieces. Life at home with Viv and their daughters Stephanie and Carla, as well as his brothers Greg, Doug and their families on the family farm was not always smooth but as an outside observer, one of the ways in which Rod contributed to harmony was a tolerance of whatever others dished up for him. He and Viv lived fairly independent lives but their wide social circle and love of a party kept them going between their respective passions for organic farming and teaching.

I can remember Su phoning Rod’s father Maurice to find out where Rod was and the exasperated answer; somewhere in America and I don’t know when he’s back. But I also remember marvelling at Rod getting back from an trans pacific flight then the same afternoon jumping on the tractor to plough up the new veggie cropping paddock before the rains came. During those years of globe trotting Maurice provided a back stop for Rod and supported the organic methods which were adopted by brothers Greg and Doug. Like his father, Rod was a big bloke and worked like few of the baby boom generation could. Within the organic/green movement intellectuals he was as sharp as the best of us but in the spud paddock, no one I know could work day in day out like Rod. I remember when I had a chronicly bad back he told me in all seriousness that picking spuds was great for fixing a bad back. In his later years his knees began to give him trouble after all those years working across the furrows and mounds of several acres of irrigated vegetable he cranked out year after year.

Rod with PDC students. Photo: Ian Lillington

In the early 1990s we began taking our residential Permaculture Design Course participants to his farm to get a taste, literally, of a real organic farm that best illustrated permaculture principles supplying local and central markets with basic food. Rod’s seamless grasp of everything from soil ecology, tree crop potentials, organic marketing and mechanics and gadgets involved in farming, was immense. We would go out and harvest the veg that didn’t meet commercial standards and take it back to the farmhouse where Su would organise the roast lunch with Maurice helping cook the farm killed mutton.

While we promoted Captains Creek as a good example of permaculture, Rod never did. In a piece I wrote in the early 1990’s I said many ecological pioneers who chose not to describe their work as permaculture did so for one of three reasons; because of the bad examples they had seen called permaculture, because they didn’t want to alienate more conservative audiences or because they didn’t think what they were doing met the high ecological standards they associated with the permaculture concept. In Rod’s case I believe it was a mix of the three with the last being the most important.

Food Relocalisation in action. Rod delivering CSA veggie boxes to Su at the Hepburn Relocalisation Network food co-op. Photo: David Holmgren

During the 1990’s I watched the rewards and strictures of supplying central markets pushing Rod towards being a specialist broccoli producer supplying Melbourne, Adelaide, Sydney and even Brisbane markets in mid to late summer when it was difficult for producers in warmer districts to do so. Rod was surprised at his own success. He thought that once the market for organics became established, the big specialist vegetable growers would take over and that he would head the other way diversifying to supply local markets using methods he had seen working in Europe, Japan and the US including farmer’s markets and community supported agriculture.

Rod’s involvement in the international organic scene continued with his membership of the scientific advisory board, IFOAM and in 2005 in bringing the IFOAM international conference to Adelaide. But over time he started to organise his exit from organics politics and to encourage the next generation onto the board of NASAA including our son Oliver. Rod’s political focus shifted back to local government and in 2006 he was elected to the Hepburn Shire. Su recalls that Rod was rather slack about campaigning, but his charm, laid back style and ability to connect to the average person got him over the line.

Around the same time after some pestering by Su to produce boxes for local customers instead of all being shipped off to central markets, Rod asked her when she wanted to start. The next week Rod delivered 6 cardboard boxes full of mixed unwashed veggies to our place for pick up by the customers that Su had organised.

Over the following couple of seasons Rod turned his whole farming operation around to focus on boxes delivered to Hepburn, Castlemaine, Ballarat and Melbourne. In the same way that centralised markets reward monocultural specialisation, box schemes demand diversity from the farmer. The fact that Rod turned his relatively large production scale around to supply that diversity was testament to his skills as a farmer. Rod’s fields were rough and ready even by organic standards, full of weeds and some produce not making the grade but the productivity from limited and often erratic input of skilled labour was truly amazing.

Rod in 2005 at the IFOAM conference doing an Aussie farmer skit. Photo: David Holmgren

Apart from extra needs for catering for events and courses, we have always grown our own produce without the fuel and gadgets (Rod’s term for farm equipment) that sustained Rod’s farming operation but there were years where in disgust I thought I should give up and just buy from Rod. Whatever the season and the weather Rod just kept on delivering and at the end of the season the weedy fields full of left over veg was good to fatten the sheep after the gleaners had their share. My personal comparison with Rod led me to assert that I am probably a better ecological builder than ecological farmer but I know what the world needs more. We have enough buildings already but we need to eat each day.

On council Rod was a mover and a shaker, using his deep experience with negotiation and decision making, process and protocol to good effect but in a context very different from the parochial years on Creswick council in his youth. He championed a Climate Change and Peak Oil policy for Hepburn Shire, the second in the state and a number of other pioneering initiatives at a time when Hepburn was becoming famous for the first community owned wind farm in Australia.

After Viv died tragically in the Samoan tsunami in 2009 Rod poured himself into local council, and as mayor contributed to the growth of the local food culture as central to the tourist economy of the region. In 2011 he managed to get funding for an Energy Descent Action Plan for Hepburn shire but Rod’s vision and the consultancy that I delivered in response were too radical even for our progressive environmentally aware community.

On the home front Rod began to focus on the future with development of Viv’s Lang Road property and a vision for the farm into the future. After leaving council Rod threw himself into a farm redevelopment plan at the same time as he was active in the Greens, supporting his daughter Steph’s candidacy, and even stood for the Greens in the seat of Ripon.

He did try to engage me in a farm planning process but with my focus on teaching and writing, Rod couldn’t wait and in typical style he whipped up cabins, an autonomous power system, new fencing, a farm processing shed and other infrastructure necessary following the formal division of the farm between the three brothers following Maurice’s death. It was only around this time that I discovered my good mate had originally trained as a diesel mechanic and that his ability with machines was more than rudimentary but like everything else if a vehicle or machine was working, Rod’s energy was focused elsewhere. If machinery failed, like sheep getting into the crops, Rod could just cut his loses and move on.

Rod was also a motorbike rider, what a friend and local doctor called “a temporary citizen”. Just another one of the risks he took along with the weather, the crops, the politics and at times the law. But I know that while Rod had incredible energy he was not manic and not ever what I would call reckless.

When his luck ran out on the way home from Ballarat after getting a tool for current building projects, the wonders of modern intensive care gave the hope of a rebuild and another chance for my old mate Rod to at least pass on his incredible knowledge of the farm and life to the next generation. But that process was already well underway. After decades of working with and teaching volunteers, interns and community members the in and outs of farming, Rod had been working with his daughters on the farm future. Stephanie and her partner Oggy along with his bother Serge have been working to keep Captains Creek organics humming.

Hopefully the farm customers and especially all of us who knew Rod can support the May family to build on the vision and the legacy after the great man had to cut his loses and move on

To Rod’s family, daughters, Steph + Carla, and his brothers, Greg and Doug, we send our love and deepest condolence.

– David Holmgren, Hepburn, 30 May 2017

You can read the obituary Jason Alexandra and I wrote for Rod in The Age here.

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19 Responses to Vale Rod May

  1. Chantel May 30, 2017 at 6:26 pm #

    Wow! What a man!
    Thanks for this David, it was lovely to read and learn about Rod through your words and experience.

    Love to all hurting and hope you grieve well.

    Xx

  2. Benedict May 30, 2017 at 9:14 pm #

    Such sad news, we loved staying on the farm and meeting Rod, I was hoping to cross paths again soon. x love Ella and Benedict

  3. Jill Taylor May 30, 2017 at 10:29 pm #

    So saddened to hear of Rod’s passing. A wonderful man! Well written David. Jill Taylor

  4. Iain Banfield May 30, 2017 at 10:54 pm #

    So sad to hear David. Met Rod in the 90’s when we spent the weekend at his farm with some Yarra Valley permaculture folk. Still have fond memories of him. Never new that he had been a mayor though. Lovely piece of writing.

  5. Laurel Freeland May 31, 2017 at 9:20 am #

    Rod was a huge presence in this region. Thanks for sharing some history of his commitment to our region and to the Earth. I will miss him so.

  6. Lisa Farinosi May 31, 2017 at 10:26 pm #

    I’m sorry you have lost your long-time special friend Su and David.. I loved that Su hassled him to deliver boxes locally.. I can just imagine the conversation:) So many of us have been nourished by those boxes over the years! Love to you both, as well as Rod’s daughters and brothers x x

  7. Graham (food garden) June 1, 2017 at 12:08 pm #

    Beautifully written David
    A lovely man with a great humour

  8. Fiona Chambers June 1, 2017 at 5:54 pm #

    Thanks David for this lovely and fitting tribute to a great man.

  9. Mara Ripani June 1, 2017 at 8:32 pm #

    Thank you so much David. I so wish we could have had him for longer. I really, really valued him as a neighbour and was so proud to live so close to such a wonderful and inspiring person.

  10. Peter Hobbs June 2, 2017 at 10:46 am #

    So sad to learn of Rod’s passing. I had the great privilege of spending (wwoofing) two weeks at Captains Creek in 2004 and 2008. I absolutely loved and respected the man. He had a wonderful nature and great knowledge and wisdom. My condolences to close friends and family

  11. Peter Hobbs June 2, 2017 at 10:48 am #

    Wonderful Tribute too. Thank you

  12. Lyn Rayner June 3, 2017 at 6:23 am #

    Thank you for a wonderfully written article. I did not know about this man….wish I had he seems to have been an amazing human. Thanks again for your writing. Best wishes to the family

  13. Sandipa June 5, 2017 at 2:08 pm #

    Thank you David for your writing here… so appreciated to learn more about Rod and it is healing to read.

  14. Steve Burns June 5, 2017 at 10:10 pm #

    Thanks Dave…. a great tribute to a great friend

  15. Michael Burlace June 5, 2017 at 11:28 pm #

    Thank you David,
    this is a beautiful tribute to a wonderful man and a pillar of the organic community (and any other community he could contribute to).

    I worked with Rod when I was the NSW Department of Agriculture’s Organic Farming Officer and an organic farmer. We shared many a discussion (some robust, of course, but always positive with Rod) on the various organic standards committees that laid the foundation for the broader world standards that Rod continued to work on.

    He was good fun, very committed and quite the larrikin – a characteristic we seem to be losing in this strait-laced era.

    Rod may be gone and he may even slip from people’s memories in the long-distant future, but his mark will be there for a long time because he poured Rodness into so much for so long.

    Farewell Rod and thanks for all that you gave and did.

    Michael Burlace

  16. Kale Sniderman June 6, 2017 at 10:05 pm #

    Thank you, David, for composing this thoughtful reflection about Rod, whose wry observations I remember fondly. I was talking to Rod one day, trying to convince him of the nutritional value, and potential pasture value, of Prairie Grass, which was lushly growing on one of the roadside verges bordering his farm. I cannot forget his self-deprecating reply, to the effect that he basically “never noticed plants lower than his shoulders”.

  17. Francis Rouhan June 7, 2017 at 9:47 am #

    Hi David

    Rod will take up the mantle as the “Man of The Trees”. From Uni to the Co-op to Branch Out to Saving the Franklin he was a man of principles.

    He will be sorely missed

    Francis Rouhan

  18. Frances Miichaels June 15, 2017 at 7:44 am #

    Very sad to hear that Rod has died but what a well lived life. His contribution to the planet was immense and he has managed to pass that passion onto the next generation, not always easy to do when spending so much time at meetings, conferences and travelling. Thank you David for posting this.

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  1. Winter: Feijoa harvests + bioluminescent mushrooms – gardening.newspaperperiod.com - August 30, 2017

    […] mud and bubbling pots, however, there’s been a good amount of grieving happening here also. Rod May, organic pioneer, farmer, general legend and close friend of Su and David’s, died recently […]

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